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Seven Wealth E-Resources Private Limited took a very different kind of initiative regarding the life transformation where everyone can change his/her life and live a purposeful life on this earth

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Why Happiness

Why Happiness

We all want to live happy and fulfilling lives and we want the people we love to be happy too. So happiness matters to all of us.

Happiness is about our lives as a whole: it includes the fluctuating feelings we experience everyday but also our overall satisfaction with life. It is influenced by our genes, upbringing and our external circumstances – such as our health, our work and our financial situation. But crucially it is also heavily influenced by our choices – our inner attitudes, how we approach our relationships, our personal values and our sense of purpose.
Happiness means feeling good about our lives and wanting to go on feeling that way. Unhappiness means feeling bad and wanting things to change”.

There are many things in life that matter to us – including health, freedom, autonomy and achievement. But if we ask why they matter we can generally give further answers – for example, that they make people feel better or more able to enjoy their lives. But if we ask why it matters if people feel better, we can give no further answer. It is self-evidently desirable. Our overall happiness – how we feel about our lives – is what matters to us most.

In recent years there have been substantial advances in the science of well-being with a vast array of new evidence as to the factors that affect happiness and ways in which we can measure happiness more accurately. We now have an opportunity to use this evidence to make better choices and to increase well-being in our personal lives, homes, schools, workplaces and communities.

The research shows that we need a change of priorities, both at the societal level and as individuals. Happiness and fulfilment come less from material wealth and more from relationships; less from focussing on ourselves and more from helping others; less from external factors outside our control and more from the way in which we choose to react to what happens to us.

If we agree that for all human beings it is important that they experience happiness and escape misery, then it follows that the best society is the one in which there is the least misery and the most happiness.
On this basis, everyone’s happiness counts equally. This includes the happiness of everybody now alive as well as that of future generations. So it is important that we act in a way that takes the happiness of all into consideration. If we can agree on this then we’re one step closer to achieving a happier society.

Can Happiness be Measured?
In recent years, a lot of research is gone into how to measure happiness and identifying the factors that affect it. The most basic way of measuring it involves asking individuals how they feel about their lives – known as subjective well being. A typical question is, “Taking all things together, how happy are you?” – with possible answers from 0 (extremely unhappy) to 10 (extremely happy).

Although it is a subjective phenomenon – measured using people’s own reports of their lived experience – there is now growing evidence that our subjective experiences have an objective reality. For example:

  • Self-reported happiness correlates well with measurements of bodily functioning, such as blood pressure, heart rate and immune system responses
  • People’s answers also correlate with brain activity – for example the correlation of positive affect with electrochemical activity in the left side of the brain and of negative affect with activity on the opposite side
  • People’s answers also correlate well with independent assessments given by friends and family that know them
  • The Philosophy of Happiness.
    The idea that happiness matters is very British in its modern origins. In the mid-18th century, the Scottish philosopher Frances Hutcheson was the first to describe the best society as the one that had “the greatest happiness of the greatest number”. Similar ideas were held by his friends Adam Smith and David Hume. But the genius who carried the idea much further was Jeremy Bentham, the English lawyer who inspired so many of the legal and social reforms of the early 19th century. Later in the 19th century the idea was powerfully restated by John Stuart Mill.
    It was also widespread elsewhere. It was held by many of the French “philosophes” of the 18thcentury and by Italian reformers like Beccaria. But it took deepest root in theNew World where Thomas Jefferson asserted that “the care of human life and happiness… is the only legitimate objective of good government”.Jefferson also drafted the classic phrases in the American Declaration of Independence about life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
    The philosophy of happiness has continued to have profound influence to this day, both in intellectual discourse and in everyday arguments about what is right and wrong. Most of those who espouse it today are concerned not only with average happiness but also with inequalities in happiness: they consider it more important to reduce misery than to increase happiness (though both are desirable).

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